An update regarding travel to Canada (as of February 16).

A few weeks ago we outlined the Government of Canada’s new COVID testing requirements for air travellers coming to this country. Additional measures were announced late January, and are now in effect.

The new rules and restrictions include the following:

  • Flights to and from Mexico and Caribbean countries have been suspended until April 30,
  • International commercial passenger flights (as well as private/business and charter flights) are being directed to only four airports – Toronto Pearson International Airport, Montreal-Trudeau International Airport, Vancouver International Airport, and Calgary International Airport, and
  • Air travellers arriving in Canada must stay in a government-approved hotel for three nights and take a COVID-19 molecular test, both at the traveller’s own expense (with quarantine/isolation to follow).

The Canadian government is also planning to introduce a 72-hour pre-arrival test requirement for travellers entering Canada at a land crossing, although commercial truckers will still be exempt. And the ban on cruise ship visits to Canada will be extended until February 2022.

General travel and quarantine information can be found here, with more information about the new restrictions listed here; additional information about quarantine rules and exemptions to these restrictions can be found here. And (as always), watch our blog – and our Twitter feed – for other pertinent updates.

UPDATE: As of February 15, all travellers arriving by land are required to provide proof of a negative COVID-19 molecular test (taken in the United States) within 72 hours of pre-arrival. And as of February 22, all air and land travellers will be required to take a COVID-19 molecular test when arriving in – or crossing into – Canada. Air travellers are also required to reserve a three-night stay in a government-authorized hotel prior to departure. These measures are in addition to existing mandatory pre-boarding health requirements for air travellers. Full details can be found on the Government of Canada’s website.

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